True, embellished and fictional stories for your amusertainment

Invisible Helmet

Regardless of what they say, I don’t believe that everything on the Internet is true.

For example, I found that the first bicycle helmet was invented in 10,000 BC by Arnold Squartsneger, yet the first bike wasn’t invented until 1817. Arnold must have been prophetic to see the need nearly 12,000 years in advance. How did he know that people might need protection from cracking their heads open? Either that, or someone else was cracked when they supplied the information.

While there’s plenty of bunk in cyberspace, there’s amazing and true information as well.

Although it might sound crazy, there’s now an invisible bicycle helmet.

Two Swedish designers have invented a new way to keep cyclists safe — an invisible helmet called the Hövding. The new helmet is an airbag that fits into a large collar around the rider’s neck.

Invisible Bike Helmet

Invisible Bike Helmet*

It’s described as invisible since it can only be seen when the rider has an accident. If a biker falls off their bicycle, the collar fills with gas causing the airbag to surround the riders head.

The designers wanted to prevent injuries and thought people would be more likely to wear a helmet if it looked fashionable. The catch? The collar costs more than $500 and can only be used once.

I could definitely use one of these but I need coverage for more than just my head.

May the farce be with you!

Your IFF,

Pam

 

*Photo from newsweek.com

Nail Salon

A relaxing day at the spa

A relaxing day at the spa

Al’s Diner is a breakfast eatery. At only 10 feet wide, seating 14 patrons along one counter, it’s the smallest restaurant in Minneapolis.

With a legendary reputation of great food and long lines, Stephen, my friends and I, decided to give it a try.

My cohorts

My cohorts

We got in line outside thinking the wait wouldn’t be too long because there were only about 6 people ahead of us.

The line didn't seem that long...

The line didn’t seem that long…

However, once we got inside, we found that the line continued to the end of the restaurant.

Until we looked inside

Until we looked inside

We had already invested enough time waiting that we couldn’t just walk away.

We're getting close

We’re getting close

After an hour wait, our turn had arrived but only three seats were open. Three quarters of our party was seated, we just needed one more stool.

Al’s practice was to seat parties together, so it didn’t matter where the lone stool opened. If it wasn’t next to my group, other patrons would be instructed to move down to make room for me.

I ended up waiting another 30 minutes before being seated. During that time, I talked to a man in line behind me. Like me, he’d never been to Al’s, but his daughter said the food was delicious and it was worth the wait.

When I eventually joined my party, I noticed the yellow booklets on the lower shelves behind the counter. Frequent customers can purchase meal books and pre-pay for their food, hence the yellow books.

Behind the counter

Behind the counter

After an hour and 45 minutes from the time we began our journey, breakfast was served. I ate blueberry pancakes with bacon. It was tasty but I think anything would have tasted good at that point.

My buddy from the line stopped to ask about my meal on his way out. We both agreed the food was good. He said he thought it was worth the wait and asked if I thought so too. After standing more than an hour and a half, my brain wouldn’t allow anything less than agreement.

Now that I’ve gained some distance, I believe the experience was fun and worth doing once.

Was it really worth the wait? Probably not.

However, as customers perpetuate the myth, the legend will continue.

May the farce be with you!

Your IFF,

Pam

Arrgh! Pirates!

Yikes! Pie rats!

Yikes! Pie rats!

Aye, Aye Captain

International sensation “Talk Like A Pirate Day” is Friday, September 19. By now you’ve probably got a pirate name, outfit and know how to talk like a pirate. If not, go here – fast – because there isn’t much time.

With the basics safely under control, it’s time to make yourself stand out. This wonderful holiday only comes once a year, so make the best of it and gather unusual props.

Pirate Props To Make A Statement

1. Carry a parrot on your shoulder all day. Make sure it’s wings are clipped and it doesn’t eat your ear.

Think of her beak as a very sharp, strong can opener on the end of her face

Think of her beak as a very sharp, strong can opener on the end of her face

 

2. Combine International Pirate Day with Bring Your Dog To Work Day. It’s okay if you don’t work in an office, just bring your Pirate Dog with you where ever you go. Be sure he/she has a pirate name.

 

Dewey The Destroyer

Dewey The Destroyer

3.  Find a cohort to dress up with you. Make them call you Captain and do your bidding. Better yet, find a dog and human wearing matching pirate costumes.

 

Scurvy Stephen with Mia the Merciless and Dewey the Destroyer

Scurvy Stephen with Mia the Merciless and Dewey the Destroyer

4. Make an Aye Aye your companion. Be sure to name him Captain. If you’re unfamiliar with the Aye Aye, check out Ze Frank’s hilarious short video “True Facts About the Aye Aye”.

Happy National Talk Like A Pirate Day!

May the F-Arrr-ce be with ye, Mateys!

Your IFF,

Poopdeck Pam

No Man’s Land

Gnome Man's Land

Gnome Man’s Land

The power of positive thinking and self-fulfilling prophecy often go hand in hand.

The young woman who married a dog is a perfect example.

Village elders told 18 year old Mangli Munda that she was cursed with bad luck and hounded her to marry a canine in order to lift the spell.

Not thrilled with the arranged marriage, Mangli said: “I am marrying a dog because the village elders believe that my evil spell will be passed on to the dog.”

Fortunately the wedding is not legally binding. Mangli won’t need to divorce the pup before remarrying.

Apparently other young women have taken the same path with grrrreat success.

Who knows whether the evil spell is actually absorbed by the dog. The important thing is that Mangli and her villagers believe it is. As a result, the curse is broken.

I’m all for the power of positive thinking and think I’ll try it out myself. Maybe a self-fulfilling “profitsy” that nets long-term financial security, at least for my dogs.

May the farce be with you!

Your IFF,

Pam

Sheru & Mangli

Sheru & Mangli

Photo credits: Barcroft India

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